Form PlayStation Exclusive Hohokum Comes To The PC On Steam

Hohokum

Screenshots: Hohokum

While a big deal has been made about some forms PlayStation exclusives coming to the PC—like Horizon duck God of Warno deal was made last week whatever about a game with a much lower profile, but which I love regardless.

That game is Hohokumwhich was first released on the PlayStation 4 (and PS3, and Vita) in 2014, and which remains one of the most chill video game experiences available. A collaborative work between artist Richard Hogg, developers Honeyslug and the record label Ghostly, Hohokum ice a beautiful 2D adventure where you play as a worm…kite…thing that just floats around its various levels, poking around a colorful landscape just to see what happens.

HOHOKUM | Now Available On Steam

It’s magic. I love this game so much amidst all the hardware drama and blockbuster releases making up our roundup of the last console generation I wrote a whole thing just about this little gaming, which I described as being—in terms of meeting its ambitions—perfect.

You move a big snake thing around a floating landscape, and sometimes you run into things, and sometimes you fly through things. You’re never fighting, talking, nor really doing much of anything.

Yet for Hohokum these aren’t limitations. They’re a canvas.

It’s a game that understands the links between interaction, visuals and soundtrack to a terrifyingly perfect degree. Each is inspired by and reliant on the other two, to the point where once it gets going Hohokum is almost synaesthetic.

One thing Hohokum is now proving to also be is timeless. Eight years on from its original release its art style hasn’t aged a day, and technically looks as though it could have been released yesterday. The heavyweight soundtrack accompanying it also sounds as good in 2022 as it did in 2014, no doubt helped by the fact that many of the artists involved—like Tycho—are still killing it today.

So if you haven’t owned a PlayStation in a while and never got to check this out, I cannot recommend it highly enough. Annapurna has published this PC version (which, admittedly, is probably why less of a fuss was made than if Sony had released it), and it’s out on Steam now.

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